Friday, April 16, 2010

Medarticles need article

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dear group members i need this article.......please help me

thank u

J Chromatogr A. 2004 Jul 23;1043(2):323-7.

Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from aromatic herbs: comparison with conventional hydro-distillation.

Lucchesi ME, Chemat F, Smadja J.

Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances, Naturelles et des Sciences des Aliments, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Université de la Réunion, 15 Avenue René Cassin, BP 7151, F-97715 Saint Denis Messag Cedex 9, La Réunion, France DOM.

Abstract

Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) is a combination of microwave heating and dry distillation, performed at atmospheric pressure without added any solvent or water. Isolation and concentration of volatile compounds are performed by a single stage. SFME has been compared with a conventional technique, hydro-distillation (HD), for the extraction of essential oil from three aromatic herbs: basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), garden mint (Mentha crispa L.), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.). The essential oils extracted by SFME for 30min were quantitatively (yield) and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar to those obtained by conventional hydro-distillation for 4.5 h. The SFME method yields an essential oil with higher amounts of more valuable oxygenated compounds, and allows substantial savings of costs, in terms of time, energy and plant material. SFME is a green technology and appears as a good alternative for the extraction of essential oils from aromatic plants.

PMID: 15330107 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]













MD. QUSSEN AKHTAR
CSIR-UGC(NET) -JRF
CIMAP-JNU Ph. D
Biotechnology Division
CENTRAL INSTITUTE OF MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS (CIMAP),
PICNIC SPOT ROAD, KUKRAIL LUCKNOW,
U.P. 226015

Mob. +919369304198

email:
qussen10@yahoo.co.in
qussen10@gmail.com

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[socialactionfoundationforequity:2426 Legislation to ban discrimination against children of AIDS parents demanded

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Legislation to ban discrimination against children of AIDS parents demanded



The Imphal Free Press

IMPHAL, April 16: Demanding a state policy for the safety of people living with HIV/Aids and to punish the culprits who killed the 18 years old orphan Noinoisana alias Garman an ART patient by unknown persons at Malom Tulihal Makha Leikai, a mass sit-in-protest was organized today at Keishampat junction by NGOs working for the people living with HIV/AIDS.

The protesters included volunteers of SASO, MNP+, CARE Foundation, Bosco Mangal and Kripa Foundation.

While speaking to the media Jiban Mala Devi, managing director of the Kripa foundation Imphal disclosed that people living with HIV/AIDS in the state despite facing discrimination from the society are now subjected to fresh cause for insecurity.

The recent killing of Noinoisana has ensured this, she said. She further said that there is an immediate need for framing a state policy for protection of people living with HIV and AIDS specially orphans and destitute children whose parents died out of HIV/AIDS. 

Besides there is a need to also allow them to live with dignity. Towards this, there is a need for the state government to frame appropriate policies, she said.

The managing director representing the participants of the dharna today made strong appeals to the state government to book the culprits involved in the killing and punish as per the law.

It also said the government should not resort to the usual tactics of arresting some suspects just so that public anger is toned down. In a later development the sit-in-protest was disallowed by a team of Imphal West police following the failure of the agitators to produce official permit from the concerned district magistrate and dharna was forced to a premature conclusion at about 12.30 pm this afternoon.


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Truth resides in every human heart, and one has to search for it there, and to be guided by truth as one sees it. But no one has a right to coerce others to act according to his own view of truth. - Mohandas Gandhi
 
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[socialactionfoundationforequity:2426 Woman 'have inbuilt fear of getting fat that does not exist in men'

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Woman 'have inbuilt fear of getting fat that does not exist in men'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1266007/Woman-inbuilt-fear-getting-fat-does-exist-men.html

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER
Last updated at 3:05 PM on 16th April 2010

Comments (54)
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The study suggests that even women who are happy and healthy have a
subconscious fear of getting fat

Women have a subconscious fear of getting fat, a study has found.

When they see an overweight woman, their brain reacts negatively,
increasing feelings of unhappiness and even selfloathing, say
researchers.

While this is common in anorexics and others with eating disorders,
the experts found it also happens in healthy women with no obvious
worries about their weight.

Men, however, showed no such response.

The study suggests women are under such pressure to conform to certain
body shapes that even those happy and healthy have a subconscious fear
of getting fat.

The research in the U.S. used MRI scans to study the reaction of the
brain to images of strangers for the journal Personality and
Individual Differences.

When women caught sight of an overweight, female stranger, it set off
a reaction in the part of the brain that processes 'identity and self
reflection'.

A similar test on men showed no such reaction.

Neuroscientist Mark Allen said: 'These women have no history of eating
disorders and project an attitude that they don't care about body
image.

'Yet under the surface is an anxiety about getting fat.'

Allen and his team are conducting a long term psychological study to
improve the treatment of eating disorders.

When women with such disorders, including anorexia and bulimia, see an
overweight stranger their own brain sets off feelings of self-loathing
and extreme unhappiness.

This increases the pressure to stay thin.

But the tests suggest a similar reaction exhibiting what the
researchers call 'sub-clinical issues with body image.'

Allen added: 'Although these women's brain activity doesn't look like
full-blown eating disorders, they are much closer to it than men
are.'

Fellow researcher, psychologist Diane Spangler, said a constant
bombardment of images of stick thin models and actresses make women
think than thin is the ideal shape.

She said: 'Many women learn that bodily appearance and thinness
constitute what is important about them, and their brain responding
reflects that.

'I think it is an unfortunate and false idea and does put one at
greater risk for eating and mood disorders.'

--
Truth resides in every human heart, and one has to search for it there, and to be guided by truth as one sees it. But no one has a right to coerce others to act according to his own view of truth. - Mohandas Gandhi

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[socialactionfoundationforequity:2425 UN REPORT ON BHUTTO MURDER FINDS PAKISTANI OFFICIALS ‘FAILED PROFOUNDLY’

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UN REPORT ON BHUTTO MURDER FINDS PAKISTANI OFFICIALS 'FAILED
PROFOUNDLY'
New York, Apr 15 2010
http://www.un.org/News/dh/infocus/Pakistan/UN_Bhutto_Report_15April2010.pdf

Security arrangements by Pakistan's federal and local authorities to
protect assassinated Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto were "fatally
insufficient and ineffective" and subsequent investigations into her
death were prejudiced and involved a whitewash, an independent United
Nations inquiry <"http://www.un.org/News/dh/infocus/Pakistan/
UN_Bhutto_Report_15April2010.pdf
">reported today.

The UN Commission of Inquiry, appointed last year by Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon at the request of the Pakistani Government, reached no
conclusion as to the organizers and sponsors behind the attack in
which a 15-year-old suicide bomber blew up Ms. Bhutto's vehicle in the
city of Rawalpindi on 27 December 2007.

But it found that the Government was quick to blame local Taliban
commander Baitullah Mehsud and Al-Qaida although Ms. Bhutto's foes
potentially included elements from the establishment itself.

"A range of Government officials failed profoundly in their efforts
first to protect Ms. Bhutto and second to investigate with vigour all
those responsible for her murder, not only in the execution of the
attack, but also in its conception, planning and financing," the
Commission said.

"Responsibility for Ms. Bhutto's security on the day of her
assassination rested with the federal Government, the Government of
Punjab and the Rawalpindi District Police. None of these entities took
necessary measures to respond to the extraordinary, fresh and urgent
security risks that they knew she faced."

General Pervez Musharraf was president at the time of the suicide
bombing in Rawalpindi. The report said the then federal Government
lacked a comprehensive security plan, relying instead on provincial
authorities, but then failed to issue to them the necessary
instructions.

"Particularly inexcusable was the Government's failure to direct
provincial authorities to provide Ms. Bhutto the same stringent and
specific security measures it ordered on 22 October 2007 for two other
former prime ministers who belonged to the main political party
supporting General Musharraf," it stated.

"This discriminatory treatment is profoundly troubling given the
devastating attempt on her life only three days earlier and the
specific threats against her which were being tracked by the ISI
(Inter-Services Intelligence agency)," it added, stressing that her
assassination could have been prevented if the Rawalpindi District
Police had taken adequate security measures.

Turning to the immediate aftermath of the attack, the Commission found
that police actions and omissions, including the hosing down of the
crime scene and failure to collect and preserve evidence, inflicted
irreparable damage to the investigation.

"The collection of 23 pieces of evidence was manifestly inadequate in
a case that should have resulted in thousands," it said. "The one
instance in which the authorities reviewed these actions, the Punjab
(provincial) committee of inquiry into the hosing down of the crime
scene was a whitewash. Hosing down the crime scene so soon after the
blast goes beyond mere incompetence; it is up to the relevant
authorities to determine whether this amounts to criminal
responsibility."

It also found that City Police Officer Saud Aziz impeded investigators
from conducting on-site investigations until two full days after the
assassination and that the Government's assertions that Mr. Mehsud and
Al-Qaida were responsible were made well before any proper
investigation had started, pre-empting, prejudicing and hindering the
subsequent investigation.

"Ms. Bhutto faced serious threats in Pakistan from a number of
sources," the Commission said. "These included Al-Qaida, the Taliban
and local jihadi groups, and potentially from elements in the
Pakistani establishment. Notwithstanding these threats, the
investigation into her assassination focused on pursuing lower-level
operatives allegedly linked to Baitullah Mehsud."

It stressed that investigators dismissed the possibility of
involvement by elements of the Pakistani establishment, including the
three persons identified by Ms. Bhutto as threats to her in her 16
October 2007 letter to General Musharraf. It also noted that
investigations were severely hampered by intelligence agencies and
other Government officials, which impeded an unfettered search for the
truth.

"The Commission believes that the failures of the police and other
officials to react effectively to Ms. Bhutto's assassination were, in
most cases, deliberate," it declared.

The three-member panel, which was headed by Chilean Ambassador to UN
Heraldo Muñoz and included Marzuki Darusman, former attorney-general
of Indonesia, and Peter Fitzgerald, a veteran official of the Irish
National Police, urged the Government to undertake police reform in
view of its "deeply flawed performance and conduct."

It also recommended the establishment of a fully independent Truth and
Reconciliation Commission to investigate political killings,
disappearances and terrorism in Pakistan in recent years in view of
the backdrop of a history of political violence carried out with
impunity.

Ms. Bhutto's widower, Asif Ali Zardari, is the current Pakistani
President.
http://www.un.org/apps/sg/sgstats.asp?nid=4494

In a <"http://www.un.org/apps/sg/sgstats.asp?nid=4494">statement
issued by his spokesperson, Mr. Ban commended the commissioners and
their staff for completing their challenging nine-and-a-half month-
long task "expeditiously and in a professional manner."

In a later news conference today, Mr. Muñoz stressed that the
Commission interviewed more than 250 interviews with Pakistanis and
others both inside and outside Pakistan, reviewed hundreds of
documents, videos, photographs and other documentary material provided
by federal and provincial authorities in Pakistan and others.

In the report, the Commission said it was "by the efforts of certain
high-ranking Pakistani Government authorities to obstruct access to
military and intelligence sources" but during an extension of its
mandate until 31 March it was able eventually to meet with some past
and present members of the Pakistani military and intelligence
services.

--
Truth resides in every human heart, and one has to search for it there, and to be guided by truth as one sees it. But no one has a right to coerce others to act according to his own view of truth. - Mohandas Gandhi

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[socialactionfoundationforequity:2423 Introducing the New Impact Newsletter

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--- On Fri, 16/4/10, Human Rights Watch <webadmin@hrw.org> wrote:

From: Human Rights Watch <webadmin@hrw.org>
Subject: Introducing the New Impact Newsletter
To: "Avnish Jolly" <avnishjolly@yahoo.com>
Date: Friday, 16 April, 2010, 23:23

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Visit hrw.org >>

Logo NEWSLETTER APRIL 2010 Follow us on spacer
IMPACT

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Google Defends Internet Freedom 
The search engine stops censoring information and ideas in China. 

photos   READ MORE >>

Violence in Colombia 
Successors to Colombia's paramilitaries continue their criminal activities and abuses.  

photos   READ MORE >>

HRW In The News

Empty Promises?
By Ken Roth
Executive Director
In ForeignAffairs 


A Belated Victory  

By Clive Baldwin
Legal and Policy
In Haaretz


How not to Protect Children 

By Joe Amon
Health and Human Rights

In The Phenom
Penh Post
 


HRW 2010
Film Festival 
 

 
 
Sustaining Pressure on Kenya
Making a difference for children living with HIV/AIDS

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James, like many HIV-positive orphans in Kenya, went to live with a relative when his parents died of AIDS.

"He saw me as a burden," James told Juliane Kippenberg, a senior researcher in the Children's Rights Division, of the uncle who became his guardian. "He told me I should have died instead of my parents."

James was frequently beaten and ran away repeatedly to different suburbs outside Nairobi, sleeping on the street and in the forest, begging to survive. He slept in a tea kiosk for several months, was at one point arbitrarily detained by the police for a week, and landed temporarily in a children's home.

Although antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been free in Kenya since 2006, James was not able to access the life-saving drugs.

Our December 2008 report on barriers to treatment for children living with HIV revealed that neither the Kenyan government nor donors had a solid understanding of how the lack of child protection was undermining access to health care for children like James.

READ MORE >>   


 

Alongside pressure from Kenyan civil society, Human Rights Watch's report helped get a more rights-oriented Kenya National HIV/AIDS Strategic Plan into place.
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Google Defends Internet Freedom
The search engine stops censoring information and ideas in China


A cleaner sweeps the logo of Google China outside its company headquarters in Beijing. © 2010 Reuters  

 

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Last month, Google -- one of the world's most important technology companies – stood up to the Chinese government by making it clear that it will not be complicit in censoring information and ideas.

For years, corporations – including Google, Yahoo!, and Microsoft -- have bent to the Chinese government's will by engaging in preemptive self-censorship. Human Rights Watch documented this extensively in our 2006 report, named "Race to the Bottom": Corporate Complicity in Chinese Internet Censorship.

photos  READ MORE  >>


 

Google has decided to stop being part of the problem and instead be part of the solution.
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Violence in Colombia
Deadly groups terrorize citizens

Paramilitaries during a demobilization ceremony, Colombia.
© 2004 Stephen Ferry

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Human Rights Watch has revealed that successors to paramilitary groups—which the Colombian government had claimed were demobilized four years ago—have continued committing widespread abuses. Our report brings together evidence gathered in a two-year investigation and builds on more than two decades of research and reporting on Colombia.

These successor groups, whose members number in the thousands, operate in vast areas of Colombia and are responsible for massacres, killings, forced displacement, rape, and extortion, as well as drug trafficking. Their targets have included human rights defenders, trade unionists, and ordinary citizens who speak out and resist involvement in criminal activity.

Despite the serious and growing threat these groups pose to Colombian citizens, the government has yet to take serious steps to address the problem. Police units tasked with confronting them are not present in many areas where the groups operate, and only four prosecutors are charged with investigating them. In many regions, members of the public security forces appear to tolerate the groups.

  READ MORE  >>


 

Our report brings together evidence gathered in a two-year investigation and builds on more than two decades of research and reporting on Colombia.
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Truth resides in every human heart, and one has to search for it there, and to be guided by truth as one sees it. But no one has a right to coerce others to act according to his own view of truth. - Mohandas Gandhi
 
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[socialactionfoundationforequity:2423 GPF Newsletter Apr. 12-16

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--- On Sat, 17/4/10, Global Policy Forum <gpf@globalpolicy.org> wrote:

From: Global Policy Forum <gpf@globalpolicy.org>
Subject: GPF Newsletter Apr. 12-16
To: avnishjolly@yahoo.com
Date: Saturday, 17 April, 2010, 2:57

Global Policy Forum
April 12 - April 16, 2010
Security Council   Social and Economic Policy   International Justice   Nations & States    NGOs    Empire?  

 

Don't forget to follow us on Twitter and read our blog

Also, GPF has begun a news update video series, check out "The GPForum Channel"



Security Council


Picture Credit:
UN

Weapons Galore in Yemen (April 14, 2010)
In Yemen, weapons outnumber people at a ratio of three to one, amounting to some sixty-million units in the country. The proliferation of weapons fuels Yemen's civil wars and drives the instability of an already precariously balanced country. The Yemeni government is trying to pressure the parliament to pass a law that regulates arms in the country, but opposition from religious and tribal leaders has so far stopped any progress. Citizens of Yemen argue that weapons are necessary for protection, because the parliament does little to safeguard their lives and livelihoods. (Media Line)

The UN Singles Out Big Oil in Burma, With Good Reason (April 13, 2010)
UN Special Rapporteur on human rights Tomas Quintana has accused foreign oil companies operating in Burma of contributing to human rights violations occurring in the country. Oil pipelines, such as Chevron and Total, have played a large role in abuses such as forced labor, killings, rape and torture. Moreover, most of the money generated from the oil business has gone straight to the ruling military junta. (Huffington Post)

The Political Hydraulics of OPEC (April 13, 2010)
Iraq might overtake Iran in oil production in seven year's time, challenging Saudi dominance in OPEC. This could have important ramifications, particularly with regards to China. China is the world's no.2 energy importer and has long been heavily dependent on Iranian oil, leading it to defend Tehran from sanctions. Now that the Chinese National Petroleum Corporation has signed a huge deal with Iraq, it looks as though Beijing may be more willing to accept sanctions in the UN Security Council against Iran. (Global Post)

The Business of Disaster: Where's the Haiti-Bound Money Going? (April 8, 2010)
On March 31st, foreign nations and other international institutions pledged $5.3 billion toward Haiti over the next 18 months. The question is: where will all this money go? A recent conference held by twenty-two Haitian organizations stated: "[T]he process is characterized by a near-total exclusion of Haitian social actors." On the topic of where the funds are going, an estimated forty-percent of the $1.5 billion pledged by the US goes to the US military, a mere one-percent of total funds is going to the Haitian government and a worryingly large amount is being given to private security contractors. (Common Dreams)

History of Iran (Video) (March 29, 2010)
This insightful video on US-Iran relations explores the unhappy history of relations between the two countries. The video begins with the US overthrowing the democratically elected leader of Iran, Mohammad Mosaddegh, in 1953 and installing a pro-US dictator, and ends discussing the controversial Iran-Iraq war and asking pertinent questions about US sanctions against Iran. (Persians of Facebook)




Social and Economic Policy


Picture Credit:
Government Technology

Patents Trump Public Interest in Monsanto's Agri-Empire (April 13, 2010)
Findings by Robert Kremer, a US government microbiologist, raise fresh concerns about Monsanto's products and the Washington agencies that oversee them. Many experts note that US government regulatory bodies are ill equipped to address longer-term health concerns resulting from GM crop consumption. As well, patent laws interfere with health studies because independent research on biotech seeds cannot proceed without company approval. (Reuters)

Down With the Clown (April 12, 2010)
McDonald's Corporation is a pioneer of the world food system. It has fashioned the way food is grown, subsidized, processed and eaten around the world, and by targeting children as an advertising strategy McDonalds is now a $32 billion brand. The success of McDonald's raises questions as to why junk food is cheaper than healthier food, and why there is no real choice in the US diet? The answer partly lies at the feet of the world's largest agribusiness companies. (Alternet)

US Denies Climate Aid to Countries Opposing Copenhagen Accord (April 9, 2010)
The US State Department has announced that Washington will withhold climate adaptation funding from countries that oppose the anti-Kyoto document known as the "Copenhagen Accord." The Accord is criticized for not doing enough to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or protect African countries and island states most vulnerable to climate change. This US stance on climate aid is seen as way to strong-arm poor nations to consent to a subpar international climate deal. (The Guardian)

African Land Grab Not a Cure for Arab Food Concerns (April 7, 2010)
Egypt is the world's largest importer of wheat, and in a region (North Africa and the Middle East) where desertification is steadily reducing arable land, its government is increasingly looking elsewhere in Africa for agricultural production. Egyptian researchers, however, say that investment in African farmland is not enough to enhance food security, and may exacerbate conflicts over land and resources. Investment in "land grabbing" may divert financing away from necessary focus on environmental management and desertification research. (GRAIN)




International Justice


Picture Credit:
Justice 4 Consumers

Opinion: 'Nuclear Tribunal' Would Be Redundant (April 15, 2010)
At the nuclear security summit in Washington this week, Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende proposed the creation of a new international tribunal in The Hague, the Netherlands, to hold violators of 'nuclear crimes' accountable. Göran Sluiter, a professor of International Criminal Law at the University of Amsterdam, considers this an unnecessary proposal as nuclear crimes can be prosecuted in existing courts such as the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court. He assumes that Balkenende's proposal was motivated by a desire to boost The Hague's prestige as "the legal capital of the world" rather than sincere concerns over nuclear security. (NRC Handelsblad)

Argentina Tries Probing Crimes of Franco's Spain (April 15, 2010)
Argentine human rights groups have asked federal courts in Argentina to open an investigation into the crimes committed during the Spanish Civil War and the regime of former Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. Lawyers representing the Argentine relatives of the victims are invoking the principle of universal jurisdiction, which provides that genocide and crimes against humanity can be prosecuted by the courts of any country. This move comes a week after a decision by the Spanish Supreme Court to take a case against Spanish judge Baltazar Garzón. Garzon, known for his charges against various Argentine military figures, has been charged for bias and abuse of authority by opening an investigation into deaths and disappearances in Franco's Spain. (Associated Press)

Garzon and the Trouble With International Law (April 14, 2010)
Last week Spanish authorities charged Judge Baltazar Garzón with abuse of his authority by opening an investigation into deaths and disappearances during the regime of former Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. Judge Garzón is internationally known for his crusades against foreign leaders on the basis of universal jurisdiction. According to Eric Posner, a conservative professor at the University of Chicago Law School, this trial marks "the end of a failed experiment in international justice." By "experiment" he means the whole notion of universal jurisdiction as applied by domestic courts and the International Criminal Court. (Wall Street Journal)




Nations & States

European Commissioner Wants Greater Say in National Budgets (April 14, 2010)
The EU wants to avoid at all costs a repeat of the Greek financial crisis, which has sorely affected the euro. EU finance commissioner Olli Rehn has stated he would like Brussels to have more of a say over budget policies of member states. But EU member states are unlikely to allow the EU to get involved in this politically sensitive area. (Spiegel International)



NGOs


Picture Credit:
Vancouver Sun

Israeli Rights Groups View Themselves as Under Siege (April 5, 2010)
Release of the Goldstone report has led to tightening pressure on Israeli human rights NGOs as the Israeli government takes extreme measures to defend itself against war crimes accusations. Rights advocates now face increasing scrutiny, and are frequently attacked by critics who accuse their work as "endangering the country." This situation is worrying, as a senior aide to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu affirmed in a recent interview that Israel will "dedicate time and manpower to combat human rights groups" which challenge the legitimacy of the Israeli government's human rights practices. (New York Times)

Letter from Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon to the NGO Working Group on UN Access (March 30, 2010)
On March 31, 2010, Global Policy Forum received a letter from Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon on the topic of NGO access to the UN. The letter was sent in response to a recent letter to the Secretary General from the NGO Working Group on UN Access - of which Global Policy Forum is a member of - highlighting the erosion of NGO access and proposing solutions. Ban's letter was brief, low in content, and did nothing to dispel the NGO community's worries about being cold shouldered at a time when the UN Capital Master Plan is reducing space for NGO activity and providing a handy excuse. (NGO Working Group on UN Access)

NGOs Must Harness Social Media Beyond Disaster Relief (February 16, 2010)
Digital technology and social media have once again proven to be an essential catalyst for the growing impact of NGOs. In the weeks following the recent Haiti earthquake, international humanitarian NGOs reported a dramatic surge in their number of Twitter followers. Jason Cone - Communications director for Doctors Without Borders - refers to social media as a means to mobilize and overcome various obstacles faced by the organization in its disaster relief efforts. This article concurs with Cone, and further argues that the use of social media should be prioritized by NGOs at all times, and not only during crises periods. (Public Broadcasting Service - Media Shift)

Compendium of Civil Society Rights Documents (January 2010)
Digital technology and social media have once again proven to be an essential catalyst for the growing impact of NGOs. In the weeks following the recent Haiti earthquake, international humanitarian NGOs reported a dramatic surge in their number of Twitter followers. Jason Cone - Communications director for Doctors Without Borders - refers to social media as a means to mobilize and overcome various obstacles faced by the organization in its disaster relief efforts. This article concurs with Cone, and further argues that the use of social media should be prioritized by NGOs at all times, and not only during crises periods. (CIVICUS)



Empire?



Picture Credit:
World Maps Online

The Global War on Tribes (April 13, 2010)
The "War of Terror" has expanded from Afghanistan and Iraq to Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia and beyond. The main targets in this war against "Islamist Terrorism" are tribal regions. Indeed little seems to have changed since 19th Century western imperialism. Western society continues to portray tribes as primitive or backward, and - not understanding them - dismisses them as "lawless" and as "terrorist havens," thereby justifying the pillaging of their natural resources or other geo-strategic goals. (Counter Punch)

George W. Bush 'Knew Guantanamo Prisoners Were Innocent' (April 9, 2010)
Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, a former Chief of Staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell, has revealed that George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld covered up the imprisonment of hundreds of innocent men in Guantanamo Bay. According to Wilkerson, they feared that releasing these prisoners would jeopardize their push for war in Iraq and the broader War on Terror. This is the first time that such allegations have been made by a senior member of the Bush administration. Wilkerson made the accusations in support of a lawsuit filed by a Guantanamo detainee against a list of American officials. (The Times)



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Truth resides in every human heart, and one has to search for it there, and to be guided by truth as one sees it. But no one has a right to coerce others to act according to his own view of truth. - Mohandas Gandhi
 
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gsk

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